Archives de catégorie : News

Le Nouveau Testament à Venise au 15ème siècle: vers les Humanités Délivrées

Ce samedi 23 février est marqué par une annonce ats importante pour les Humanités Digitales en Suisse: l’EPFL, avec le DH Lab de Frédéric Kaplan, a signé un contrat avec l’Université Ca Foscari de Venise, pour la création d’un “Joint Research Center for Digital Humanities and Future Cities in Venice”. Gageons que c’est là le début d’une aventure étonnante, qui va voir notamment se créer la «Venice Time Machine», une modélisation de la cité des doges.

Photo wikicommons
Photo wikicommons

Derrière le rêve de cette machine se tient la potentialité de repenser l’histoire dans sa densité géographique et spatiale. Qui se rappelle encore qu’au 15ème siècle, le cardinal Basilios Bessarion, recopiait près de 1’000 manuscrits, s’intéressant et commenant tant Platon qu’Archimède, les poètes ou le Nouveau Testament?

La modernité a développé avec art une philologie des «casiers»: qui se penchait sur la philosophie n’avait pas la moindre opportunité de lire les commentaires de Bessarion sur le Nouveau Testament. Qui traquait l’histoire des mathématiques et des sciences en charchant l’histoire de l’interprétation d’Archimède ne se questionnait pas sur la perspective de Bessarion sur Platon.

Basilios Bessarion, wikicommons
Basilios Bessarion, wikicommons

La modernité a classé les manuscrits par branche, imposant à une culture humaniste la répartition stricte des champs clôturé de la culture imprimée, stabilisée juridiquement. Le 19ème siècle intrônisera la momification des textes.

La perspective de la «Venice Time Machine» devrait nous permettre de resituer le geste intellectuel de Bessarion dans son entier, à travers un corpus de textes très vaste, dans une cité où se font tractations commerciales, créations musicales, et où se vivent des épisodes anecdotiques de toutes sortes. Gageons qu’il pourrait émerger de cette entreprise un regard très neuf sur le manuscrit Gr. Z. 5 (420), 15ème siècle, NT: fol. 362-441 (GA 205), ce morceau du Nouveau Testament transmis par la plume de Bessarion.  Numérisé, accessible, il reprendra en plus sa place dans une cité vibrant de vie et d’énigmes, en plein humanisme.

Les manuscrits vénitiens digitalisés sont prêts à nous faire vivre les Humanités Délivrées.

 

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website

How to avoid the return of the risks of the Classical Age in the Digital Humanities?

This article has been corrected by Jon Wilcox (UK), after a first automatized translation from my French blog article.

Nobody likes the role of Cassandra. However, since my presentation in the Symposium in August 2011, my fear of a return of the Classical Age in the approach to knowledge has increased every day. Rather than enable the multidisciplinary research team to interrogate from, and engage with, different points of view, the machinery to standardise knowledge that the Digital Humanities represents could once again expel différance and the asymmetry, to take the words of Derrida. I ask myself this face-to-face with the “object-centred” approach which promises us a global, transparent and unequivocal knowledge base. ”OCHRE” (Object-centred high-level reference ontology) comes from Leipzig.

To take an example of the dangers of such an approach and which urgently requires  multi-disciplinary research, let us consider the “computer graphics” of the English version of the “miserable” Jeff Clarke, very judiciously presented in French by the Pegasus Data team (here Yannick Rochat) on their website. Rochet commenced with an excellent review, which continues in the blog discussion. I add here some thoughts on this ‘infographic’ that visually represents some quantitative data of an English translation of les Misérables:

Interdisciplinary teams are necessary if we are to understand how to connect and relate all quantitative and qualitative analysis in the humanities, as is the practice of the social sciences. The social sciences integrate the qualitative with the quantitative, sometimes with a great deal of pain and effort. The humanities will have to proclaim the right to the qualitative in the wave of the quantitative. Indeed, I imagine already primary and secondary school teachers filling with beautiful coloured paintings their classes about French Literature…practical, effective, aesthetic: the children and young people will develop a taste for it very quickly!

It is clear that Clarke’s infographics are all based on the choice of translation from French into English. It seems to me we must consider this infographic from the perspective of “versioning” of les Misérables. This is not an analysis of les Misérables, but a version of it, in a dated English translation. A text – and its rewriting – can no longer be regarded as a fixed and stable entity. When technologically re-produced, that which proceeds is only ever a “version” of the text. This is what led the research team of Homer Multitexte to start quoting verses of The Iliad by “manuscript”; by “version” rather than text. Even the concept of archiving is undoubtedly moving towards this “versioning”, via the regular recording of what we want to retain, which will necessarily evolve over time.

It is seriously cringe-worthy to read in Clarke’s first infographic (image above) that there is ‘positive’ words, such as “love”, and negative ones. A century of psychoanalysis has shown us that a “mother who loves her child”, is potentially ambiguous for the rest of the story… If there is “absolute values” in words (to combine the language of mathematics and literature), then perhaps we could be certain! But the peculiarity of language is its ambiguity, its floating appearance. All human sciences are built on the small percentage of meaning which always escapes all ontologies, because it is not possible to equate totally “words and things”, to quote Foucault. The celebrated French thinker has rightly diagnosed the reign of the novel in the 19th century as the revenge of language of its “canning” in the Classical Age. Since all of this has been said and thought, we will not reproduce at the end of post-modernity a Classical Age part 2!

To say, as Clarke does, that the frequency determines the importance of the characters is reductive. The concepts of the butterfly effect and of serendipity, well remind us that it may be those characters mentioned on just a few pages, or even in two paragraphs, that will change everything. In this beautiful and breathtaking meeting across fields and genres, it would be appropriate to talk of the Digital Humanities as being not just a meeting between geeks and poets, but perhaps between geeks, poets and philosophers, to extending the expression of Martin Foys in the NY Times.

 

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website

D. Fiormonte: Humanités Digitales et Sciences Sociales: un mariage conclu dans les cieux

En ce 31 janvier 2013, l’Université de Lausanne ouvre son «Laboratoire d’Humanités Digitales de l’Université de Lausanne (LADHUL)», interfacultaire et ancré dans la Faculté des Sciences Sociales et Politiques. Des informations plus détaillées suivront ici. Unil et EPFL vont ainsi pouvoir continuer de pair l’aventure des «Humanités Digitales» sur le campus lausannois, en se préparant notamment au DH 2014 (6-13 juillet 2014).

Pour fêter cet heureux événement, Domenico Fiormonte (Roma Tre) nous offre un beau texte sur la rencontre entre Humanités Digitales et Sciences Sociales, que j’ai traduit en français. Pour la version italienne et un commentaire de l’auteur, voir ici.

 

Humanités Digitales et Sciences Sociales : un mariage conclu dans les cieux

Domenico Fiormonte, Université de Roma Tre (IT)

Il existe de nombreuses définitions des Humanités Digitales, au moins autant qu’on compte d’écoles européennes et nord-américaines, qui, de manière indépendante, ont trouvé leur origine dans l’application des méthodes informatiques aux disciplines humanistes. Mais il est sans doute utile de commencer par clarifier un point de terminologie. Le mot anglais Humanities vient, comme nous le savons, du latin studia humanitatis, labellisé à la fin du Moyen-Age/début de la Renaissance, pour désigner un courant d’études qui comprenait la grammaire, la rhétorique, la poésie, l’histoire, la philosophie morale, mais également l’arithmétique et la dialectique. Toutefois, le terme humanitas, en latin classique, a désigné, pour nous les modernes, quelque chose qui s’approche de «civilisation», c’est-à-dire d’un style de vie et de pensée inspiré par des valeurs déterminées – retenues comme universelles. De telles valeurs, transformées et réinterprétées, ont assumé une fonction «prescriptive» et ont déterminé un curriculum à partir du XVIIIème siècle, en particulier grâce à l’élan des Lumières françaises et de l’Aufklärung allemande. Au siècle suivant se sont confirmées de nouvelles disciplines et savoirs (sociologie, psychologie, anthropologie, etc.) qui, de concert avec certaines «migrations» – par exemple philosophie et histoire ont toujours été à cheval entre les sciences humaines et les «humanités» -, ont conduit à la naissance du déploiement des «sciences humaines». Cette expression a fait florès avant tout dans le monde francophone, alors que le monde anglo-saxon a préféré Social Sciences (vs. Arts and the Humanities), augmentant ainsi la Babel académique.

 

Que reste-t-il aujourd’hui d’une histoire si complexe à l’intérieur des lieux de formation occidentaux ? Difficile de le dire. Mais si cette question avait peut-être encore un sens hier, elle ne l’a plus aujourd’hui. Parce qu’il est évident que la dimension digitale de la connaissance (production, transmission, accès) a abattu les barrières créées au 19ème siècle pour diviser les disciplines «scientifiques», basées sur une méthode expérimentale, et les disciplines humanistes, traditionnellement spéculatives. Toutes les différentiations de ce type apparaissent aujourd’hui non seulement comme un résidu académique anachronique, mais aussi comme un obstacle pesant à l’innovation.

 

Si nous nous tournons maintenant vers les HD, je choisirai une définition récente, qui me semble très utile pour illustrer la rigidité futile des divisions disciplinaires actuelles :

(…) the proper object of Digital Humanities is what one might call “media consciousness” in a digital age, a particular kind of critical attitude analogous to, and indeed continuous with, a more general media consciousness as applied to cultural production in any nation or period. Such an awareness will begin in a study of linguistic and rhetorical forms, but it does not stop there. (…) Digital Humanities has also a reciprocal and complementary project. Not only do we study digital media and the cultures and cultural impacts of digital media; also we are concerned with designing and making them. (W. Piez, “Something called Digital Humanities”.

http://digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/2/1/000020/000020.html

 

Dans cette définition sont comprises au moins quatre ou cinq disciplines différentes, que nous trouvons aujourd’hui réparties dans différentes facultés : non seulement les langues et les littératures, mais aussi la sociologie de la communication, les études anthropologiques et éthnographiques sur les nouveaux média, l’archivistique, la bibliothéconomie, le patrimoine culturel, et bien sûr, l’informatique.

 

Mais les raisons pour lesquelles il est inutile et nuisible de circonscrire les Humanités Digitales au plan historico-littéraro-linguistique – à part les motifs d’ordre pratique, puisque que nous savons que Social Sciences et Humanités font partie ensemble du secteur «SH» du Conseil Européen de la Recherche) –, sont avant tout d’ordre épistémologique et méthodologique.

 

Du point de vue épistémologique, je crois que le terme central est la redéfinition des objets de connaissance, soit de leurs supports et de leur forme. De tels objets sont devenus perenni mutanti, en sorte à ne plus pouvoir être étudiés et analysés d’un seul point de vue. Je donnerai un seul exemple : le concept de «document». La codification digitale d’un document, de quelque nature qu’il soit (écrit, oral, filmé, etc.), est aujourd’hui un des terrains les plus importants de redéfinition de la connaissance. Avant tout parce que nous savons que toute codification est un acte herméneutique. L’enjeu n’est pas seulement découvrir l’entropie informative du passage du support analogique au digital (qu’on considère l’aspect singulier de l’alphabet hangeul ou le manuscrit d’un auteur canonique), mais c’est aussi choisir ce qu’on conserve et transmet, et comment on le fait. Il ne s’agit pas seulement de dénoncer les limites et les implications géopolitiques de l’algorithme de Google et la commercialisation de notre identité par les média sociaux. L’enjeu est plus profond. Par exemple, pouvons-nous parler aujourd’hui des droits humains sans évoquer en même temps les procédures et les valeurs qui sont médiatisées par les pratiques discursives, les documents et les flux informatifs largement dépendants (je dirais dépendants quant à leur processus même) des technologies informatiques ? L’intervention du sociologue ne peut cependant prendre place seulement en tant que processus achevé, parce que chaque étape du processus de digitalisation (ou production native) – des représentations digitales d’un passage singulier à un produit complet de communication – présente des revers sémiotiques, sociaux, culturels, politiques, etc.

La question méthodologique se résume à ces énoncés, quand bien même elle appelle une auto-réflexion ultérieure (et probablement une auto-critique). Nous avons tous à faire avec des standards, des instruments et des ressources qui influencent et informent notre recherche et notre didactique. Mais l’attrait de nos regards pour les instruments dont nous faisons usage est le plus souvent passif. Chercher à avoir un mot à dire dans le processus de construction de tels instruments et ressources est vital pour garantir non seulement l’efficacité, mais aussi pour éviter les usages détournés, anti-démocratiques et socialement injustes. Les problématiques de la représentation, de la production, de l’accès et de la transmission des savoirs dans les dimensions digitales devraient toutes être conduites à l’articulation des sciences humaines et sociales.

Pour conclure, donc, comment pouvons-nous penser l’affrontement de tous ces défis sans une alliance entre sciences sociales, sciences informatiques et sciences humaines ? D’un certain point de vue, la route conduisant à ce mariage est amplement tracée. Elle a été indiquée, dans les années 50-60, par des pionniers comme Pierre Bourdieu, Régis Debray, Umberto Eco, Jack Goody, Eric Havelock, Harold Innis, André Leroi-Gourhan, Bruno Latour, Marshall McLuhan, Edgar Morin, Walter Ong, Raymond Williams, etc. Je vous souhaite à tous que le Laboratoire des Cultures et Humanités Digitales de l’Université de Lausanne sache relever ce défi magnifique.

Traduction C. Clivaz, Unil

 

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website

Des rencontres doctorales par-delà la frontière sciences humaines / sciences dures à Lausanne (CH)

Cette année 2013 démarre à Lausanne (CH) sur les chapeaux de roue digitaux.

Convaincus que la nouvelle académie et les futures structures de recherches seront pensées et portées par la génération des «born digital», une équipe de chercheurs lausannois a ouvert ce vendredi 11 janvier un groupe de doctorants impliqués en Humanités Digitales et provenant des sciences humaines, sociales et des nouvelles technologies.

Par-delà les divisions nées au 19ème siècles entre sciences dites humaines et sciences dures, il s’agit de retrouver les «Humanités» dans leur sens générique, comprenant sciences humaines, sociales et techniques, et mettant l’humain au centre des recherches. La remise en question des modèles scientifiques et académiques et tout aussi grande pour des branches comme la biologie, la physique ou la chimie que pour l’histoire, la codicologie ou la sociologie. Le mailström digital vient bousculer tous les domaines de recherche, telle est la conviction de l’équipe DH lausannoise.

L’expérience va culminer dans une école d’été DH à Berne (CH), du 26 au 29 juin:

http://www.dhsummerschool.ch/

Une doctorante du labo junior DH de l’ENS de Lyon, Cécile Armand, était présente et a fait un compte-rendu de la séance de ce 11 janvier 2013:

http://dhlyon.hypotheses.org/47

Une première série de présentations de travaux de doctorants auront lieu jusqu’en mars 2013, et sont annoncées dans cet article; site: http://dhlausanne.ch/.

A Berne, les grands noms des Digital Humanities seront présents, dont Ray Siemens et Susan Schreibman, pour initier doctorants et chercheurs de Suisse au Digital Humanities, du 26 au 29 juin 2013, avant le grand rendez-vous du DH 2014, du 6 au 12 juillet 2014 à Lausanne (Unil et EPFL).

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website

Ebook published: Reading Tomorrow/ Lire Demain, PPUR, Lausanne, 2012

Voici paru l’ebook du premier colloque en Suisse d’Humanités Digitales, qui a eu lieu à Lausanne en août 2011. On pourra se le procurer sur ce site pour 17frs50:

http://www.ppur.com/produit/549/9782889141494/Lire%20demain

Plus de quarante contributions y figurent, en français ou en anglais, parfois dans les deux langues.

79 pages peuvent être consultées online gratuitement:

Des chercheurs de différents horizons réfléchissent à la transformation en cours des supports scientifiques et de leurs techniques de recherche. Plus généralement, ils envisagent les modes de lecture/écriture émergents, liés à l’évolution de l’internet et aux technologies de lecture digitale. Cet ouvrage propose un tour d’horizon de l’histoire de la lecture et des littératies, c’est- à-dire des diverses formes du « savoir-lire », ainsi qu’une large réflexion épistémologique sur les nouvelles formes de communication savante engendrées par la révolution de la dématérialisation de la lecture. Une version ebook propose une publication élargie, enrichie de différents liens multimédia, regroupant toutes les conférences du premier colloque lausannois sur les Humanités Digitales. Edité par Claire Clivaz, Jérôme Meizoz, François Vallotton, Joseph Verheyden. Avec la collaboration de Benjamin Bertho.

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website

John Unsworth nominated by president Obama in Humanities

http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/09/12/president-obama-announces-more-key-administration-posts

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website

The Gene Ontology as a language: Investigating Gene Ontology annotations with Ziph’s law

Un envoi de Marc Robinson, lors d’un échange bio-informatique, médecine, humanités digitales.

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website

Dh 2012 in Hamburg

The DH 2012 in Hamburg has started with a brilliant conference by Claudine Moulin, available here:

http://lecture2go.uni-hamburg.de/konferenzen/-/k/13910

Image

The first two workshop days were like a «caverne d’Ali Baba», with for example a meeting on the tool «Voyant», a funny new way to do literary analysis.

http://voyant-tools.org/

http://hermeneuti.ca/workshops/dh12

Good news: Lausanne (Unil and EPFL) will organize the DH 2014. DH 2013 will happen in Nebraska (16-22 July 2013).

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website

Switzerland opens DH jobs / Le monde académique suisse ouvre des postes en HD

Ces jours de juillet marquent l’entrée du monde académique suisse dans les Humanités Digitales, avec trois annonces de création de postes:

– Frédéric Kaplan a été nommé professeur en Humanités Digitales à la tête d’un nouveau laboratoire à l’EPFL. C’est la première chaire en Suisse de ce domaine, dès la fin de l’été.

– la Faculté des sciences sociales et politiques (SSP) de l’Université de Lausanne met au concours un poste d’assistant diplômé en HD dès le 1er août 2012, pour conduire un doctorat sur les Humanités Digitales, sous la direction du prof. Dominique Vinck (ISS, SSP)

– la Faculté des Lettres de Berne met au concours un poste de 4 ans de professeur assistant en Humanités Digitales pour l’automne 2013 : http://www.jobs.unibe.ch/detail.asp?ID=5255&KatID=11

– la Faculté des HEC de l’Université de Lausanne aura un poste en informatique de professeur en Humanités Digitales à la rentrée 2014 (plateforme P2i)

Quelle effervescence! Voici la page d’information RTS pour le poste de l’EPFL:

http://www.rts.ch/info/sciences-tech/4139907-frederic-kaplan-a-la-tete-des-humanites-digitales-de-l-epfl.html

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website

Pinterest

Pinterest, vous connaissez?

Ce tableau géant où il s’agit «d’épingler» (to pin) des images est en passe de devenir le 3ème réseau social derrière Facebook et Twitter chez nos voisins des USA, alors même qu’il n’existe encore qu’en version béta test (sur inscription).

http://pinterest.com/

C’est la revanche de l’image sur le texte qui ne survit plus qu’à l’état de commentaire! De manière ciblée, l’image exprime un contenu de manière ramassée, autrement que le texte. C’est la «littératie» plurielle à l’oeuvre: il ne manque plus que de pouvoir ajouter de la musique ou enregistrer le commentaire pour que l’oralité soit de la partie.

Voici la version «épinglée» de ce blog:

http://pinterest.com/pin/151363237446838972/

A vos «pins»d’été!

Claire Clivaz

Claire Clivaz is Head of Digital Enhanced Learning at the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (VITAL-IT, Lausanne, CH) and belongs to an interdisciplinary team that started the Digital Humanities in Switzerland since 2011. She is also a member of the LADHUL (www.unil.ch/ladhul). This blog assumes to developp opinions and discussions on all the events and problematics around the Digital Humanities, particularly in the French speaking aerea. Claire Clivaz est Head of Digital Enhanced Learning à l'Institut Suisse de Bioinformatique (Lausanne, CH) et appartient à une équipe interdisciplinaire qui a lancé les Humanités Digitales en Suisse depuis 2011. Elle est membre du Ladhul (www.unil.ch/ladhul). Ce blog se propose de présenter et développer des sujets de discussions sur les événements et problématiques touchant aux Humanités Digitales, notamment dans l’ère linguistique et culturelle francophone.

More Posts - Website